yo lounge cafe
yo lounge cafe

polar dreamer journey to infiity (space_night_dub)

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Criticism of over-commercialization

Following the popularization of EDM in America a number of producers and DJs, including Carl Cox, Steve Lawler, and Markus Schulz, raised concerns that the perceived over-commercialisation of dance music had impacted the “art” of DJing. Cox saw the “press-play” approach taken by newer EDM DJs as unrepresentative of what he called a “DJ ethos”.[128] Writing in Mixmag, DJ Tim Sheridan argued that “push-button DJs” who use auto-sync and play pre-recorded sets of “obvious hits” resulted in a situation overtaken by “the spectacle, money and the showbiz”.[163]

Some house producers openly admitted that “commercial” EDM needed further differentiation and creativity. Avicii, whose 2013 album True featured songs incorporating elements of bluegrass, such as lead single “Wake Me Up“, stated that most EDM lacked “longevity”.[164] Deadmau5 criticized the homogenization of popular EDM, and suggested that it “all sounds the same”. During the 2014 Ultra Music Festival, Deadmau5 made critical comments about up-and-coming EDM artist Martin Garrix and later played an edited version of Garrix’s “Animals” remixed to the melody of “Old McDonald Had a Farm“. Afterwards, Tiësto criticized Deadmau5 on Twitter for “sarcastically” mixing Avicii’s “Levels” with his own “Ghosts ‘n’ Stuff” (in reference to being a last-minute substitution for Avicii on the festival schedule due to a medical issue), to which Deadmau5 asked whether playing a song “sarcastically” involved “sneer[ing] while hitting the sync button”.[165][166][167][168]

In May 2014, the NBC comedy series Saturday Night Live parodied the stereotypes of EDM culture and push-button DJs in a Digital Short titled When Will the Bass Drop?. It featured a DJ who goes about performing everyday activities—playing a computer game, frying eggs, collecting money—who then presses a giant “BASS” button, which explodes the heads of concertgoers.[169][170][171]

After years of rapid growth, the American popular EDM market started to wane in 2016 when a number of artists famous for producing so-called ‘big room’ electro-house started to diversify stylistically. This development was directly referenced by two such DJs – David Guetta and Showtek – in a techno-influenced single released in April 2016 titled ‘The Death of EDM’.[172] By the end of the 2010s, EDM’s position as the dominant force in mainstream popular music began to plateau as it became displaced by other styles.[108][173]


 

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